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Promising Practices in Transition: Results of Multi-Year, Multi-Site Study

This archived webinar describes a longitudinal multisite evaluation of the Bridges Program, a highly standardized and manualized program providing career counseling and paid supported employment during the last year of high school to youth with disabilities electing the program.  Sample youth (n = 5,847) were predominantly non-white, of low to middle socioeconomic status, with an array of disabilities, including intellectual disability.  The majority of students had learning disabilities.  The study finds that the program, as a result of the paid employment experience in the last year of high school, was highly effective, with 77% of participants achieving integrated paid employment at competitive wages after leaving high school.  There was little variation across disabilities, localities, years, and broader economic conditions, including the Great Recession.  However, researchers found a consistent gender disparity in employment outcomes with young women lagging approximately 5% behind the young male participants in all seven sites and years.

Citation:

Fabian, E., et al. (2013). “Promising Practices in Transition: Results of Multi-Year, Multi-Site Study.” from http://www.transitiontoemployment.org/index.phpoption=com_content&view=article&id=77&Itemid=82&utm_source=Transition+to+Employment+Archived+Webinars&utm_campaign=CenterNews02&utm_medium=email.

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Posted in Employment outcome data, Research and evaluation reports, Services and service innovations, Transition planning in schools
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